How to write a book in 30 days


photo from Liverpool University

I’m not sure when this was originally published, but I came across it today via a link on Twitter and thought I’d share it here for several reasons:

1. I’m curious to find out if it works
2. Book four could do with some help
3. I’d like to know what other writers think of this proposed way of working, especially if anyone has tried this method.

All links lead to the original article and related pages

How to write a book in 30 days

Stage 1: days 1-6

Stage 3: days 14-15

  • The evolution of your story

    story evolution
    A propulsive plot is crucial to the success of your novel. Spend the next couple of days reinforcing the structure of your book

Stage 5: days 25-28

Stage 2: days 7-13

Stage 4: days 16-24

Stage 6: days 29-30

  • Revising your first draft

    revising your outline
    Summon your strength for two more days of final checks before the most challenging task of all – putting some distance between you and your project

Source: The Guardian

My approach to writing is much less rigid: I work full-time and now study part-time, and although I usually have some kind of outline to follow, I’ve never written to a timetable. I jot ideas down as soon as possible after they occur to me, and I write when I feel confident that I have something to say. Sometimes that may be during a stolen few minutes at work, but more often it’s during the weekend or evening at home, in between my other commitments.

This “as-and-when” method has worked for me so far but now, with my schedule stretched more than ever, I have less time to devote to book four and I feel that a timetable may help me get back on track with it. We shall see!

Writers:

  • how do you schedule your writing?
  • do you have a timetable similar to that suggested by The Guardian?
  • what time-management tips can you share?
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About johannanield

Welsh author of a contemporary British romance trilogy
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